IndyWatch PNG Politics Feed Archiver

Go Back:30 Days | 7 Days | 2 Days | 1 Day

IndyWatch PNG Politics Feed Today.

Go Forward:1 Day | 2 Days | 7 Days | 30 Days

IndyWatch PNG Politics Feed was generated at Pacific News IndyWatch.

Thursday, 21 June

07:52

HITLERS' MODERN JOSEPH GOEBBELS IN O''NEILL'S SONJA BARRY RAMOI PNGBLOGS

by BEN NEGINTS
Joseph Goebbels was a contemporary of Adolf Hitler and a very smart media personality Hitler used during the Nazi's Reign of Terror.  He was the Minister for Communications and Propaganda and his job was to brainwash the ignorant German population on anti-Semitic views, the superiority of the White and the Nazi race  and many other lies.

Through his persistent lies and propaganda, the Jews were nearly exterminated from the face of the earth. Through his persistent lies and propaganda millions of soldiers lost their lives during the WW1. Only God knows the damages done to human lives and properties  as a result of one cunning persistent liar spreading false  news and propaganda.

Behind this backdrop of history,  I am saddened to see  a Joseph Goebbels look alike in  Sonja Barry Ramoi who without any shame persistently spreading O'Neill's lies and propaganda  through both Social and Main Stream medias on a daily basis.

To be honest,  every time I see a Press Release from Sonja Barry Ramoi I feel like throwing up. Her propaganda and false information are so nauseating and bitterly distasteful.

I am definitely sure Sonja Barry Ramoi  would be reading this post and I would like to appeal to you to stop making a  mockery of Journalism,  human intelligence,  human reasoning and human empathy.

Joseph Goebbels easily  connived his way around with the ignorant mass in those early days. Today we are living in a day and age of enlightenment.  PNGeans are no more "gullible and ignorant" idiots for  you and O'Neill to continue spreading your false  propaganda and lies.

I challenge Sonja Barry Ramoi and O'Neill and his well cushioned cronies and MPs on the Government side  to come down on the ground and see for yourselves the daily struggles every PNGean is facing. Here are a few list for you to get yourselves acquainted with:

1. Sky rocketed cost of living. Go into a shop with a K100 and you will check out at the counter with a small plastic bag  hardly containing enough to take care of a daily meal for an average PNG household...

2. Check out at the fuel pump and see how much a Liter is costing for Diesel and Petrol for poor struggling motorists....

3. Go down to a nearest General Hospital and s...

07:27

THERE WAS NO SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCE FOR SHP GOVERNOR SEAT - SEPERATION OF POWERS BREACHED PNGBLOGS

by RODERICK KANAMA

Those of you who condemned the actions of the people of Southern Highlands in Mendi should have been more scared about the judiciary being compromised

The demarcation in authority and separation of powers between the three (3) arms of Government the Judiciary, Legislature and the Executive is there to protect against apprehension of bias which may emanate from just the Government acting alone.

Unfortunately, this separation of powers has been breached. Breached in that for the first time in the history of democracy as we know it, ordinary citizens can deduce quite correctly that there is an apprehension of bias in the ruling by the Court.

This is quite evident with the recent burning of the Air Niugini aircraft and the Court House in Mendi, Southern Highlands Province.

In any democracy, a vibrant, exceptionally strong and independent judiciary and legal system, free of any influences, corruptible or otherwise, sworn to uphold the rule of law is a fundamental and essential part of the governance system.

 It becomes very dangerous when the judiciary and the legal system become subverted with external influences. Worse still is if their conduct, direct or inferred, renders their integrity questionable. This is because it will create and nurture an environment for dissent. This has been the case in many African Countries, Middle Eastern and South American Countries where coups, civil unrest and violence have been perpetrated by the general populace against Governments. This has become apparent in PNG.

Special Circumstances? What Special Circumstances? Were those boxes destroyed in a fire or a natural phenomenon that rendered the boxes and their contents unavailable to be counted thus ruling it to be special circumstance?

 Did the contents of the boxes mysteriously disappear without any physical evidence of tampering of the ballot boxes making it impossible to count? If it is neither of these circumstances, it cannot be deemed special circumstance in which case it must be by law.

But what law? Ir could it be that because Gamato may have declared the election of William Powi relying on special circumstance, the Court merely upheld that decision. But this is a case against the decision by Gamato so we go back to the...

06:00

SWP: using incentives to lift recruiter performance Devpolicy Blog from the Development Policy Centre

The Seasonal Worker Programme (SWP) continues to grow. Figures for this financial year to the end of April 2018 show 6,573 SWP visas have been approved. This compares with 6,166 visas approved in total for the full 2016-17 financial year. Moreover, most workers do very well under the scheme. When the World Bank asked 400 Pacific workers how satisfied they were with the SWP, the average score was 8.6, on a scale of one to ten. Similar smaller surveys of Timorese workers found that 96% were satisfied, with 68% very satisfied. In Vanuatu, a survey of 100 returned workers showed that all of the women and 91% of men were satisfied.

That said, this is no time for complacency. It is not clear that arrangements that support a few thousand workers will support the much larger number that could enter Australia both under the Seasonal Worker Programme and the much larger Pacific Labour Scheme. Moreover, while some countries are doing very well under the SWP (Vanuatu, Tonga, Timor-Leste), others are missing out (PNG, Solomon Islands).

The SWP also continues to be subjected to both generalised and specific claims of exploitation in the media. There are also complaints about recruiters in sending countries scamming potential workers. These incidents undermine the development benefits of the scheme, as well as wider community acceptance of the value of the SWP in Australia and in sending countries.

In responding to these problems, so far the focus has been on compliance across the horticultural industry, which is appropriate given the higher number of backpackers working on farms, and their greater risk of exploitation. Victoria, Queensland and South Australia are all introducing labour hire licensing.

There are also SWP-specific responses. One recently-announced reform is the piloting of a 24/7 information line for seasonal workers. It success will depend on how well the information the hotline receives is processed and acted on.

These are all positive moves, but what more could be done? A recent book Merchants of Labor: Recruiters and International Labor Migration by Professor Philip Martin reviews the global experience of the approximately ten million workers who cross international borders every year, and of the recruiters who find them jobs. Its a fascinating read....

Go Back:30 Days | 7 Days | 2 Days | 1 Day

IndyWatch PNG Politics Feed Today.

Go Forward:1 Day | 2 Days | 7 Days | 30 Days

Wednesday, 20 June

07:47

IF HE IS CORRUPT WHY IS HE STILL THERE? CJ'S IMPARTIALITY QUESTIONED PNGBLOGS

by MARK TOKUNAI
One of the top brains of this country, Sir Mekere Morauta once described the scale of corruption in this country as Systemic and Systematic. Many others have labelled it as having permeated throughout the fabrics of the society. Corruption is said to have widespread in Government and is prevalent in how businesses are conducted both in private and public sectors. 

We are experiencing unprecedented number of prosecutions of leaders both by police and the Ombudsman Commission. These are leaders mandated by our people but the law is keeping a check on their exercise of powers. Eventually, their fate will be ultimately determined by the judiciary. Thanks to the Deputy Chief Justice Sir Gibbs Salika, who is an unapologetic member of the bench and sending a strong message with the number of people he is sending to jail. Sir Salika seems to be motivated to send wrong doers to jail and has no time hunting escape routes for criminals. 

The judiciary, though the third arm of the tripartite system of Government, enjoys a further constitutionally entrenched independence.  In principle, the other two arms of Government supposed to provide check and balance on the judiciary. Nonetheless, nobody outside of National Judicial System including the Minister for Justice has any power to give directions to any court, or to a judge of any court, in the discharge of their judicial functions. The judicial powers that the judges exercise is the peoples power vested in them by the Constitution. Each judge takes an oath of office, promising to uphold the law and deliver justice without fear or favour.

At the decline of public confidence and trust on the other two arms of Government (Legislature and Executive), the judiciary has become the last bastion of hope for the people. Every other Legislative and Executive decisions are increasingly subjected to judicial scrutiny.  This has elevated the judiciary to be more powerful and incompatibly superior to the other two arms of government.

International and regional human rights instruments recognise as fundamental the right of everyone to due process of law, including a fair and public hearing by a competent, independent and impartial tribunal established by law.

It's beneficial to have an independent judiciary. The question is who effectively scrutinises the judicial functions? Those who ar...

06:00

In disasters, violence against women is the huge, often hidden story Devpolicy Blog from the Development Policy Centre

After her sons murder, Miriam* finally fled her village in Myanmars conflict-ravaged Rakhine State. Even as Miriam escaped, the few precious belongings she could grab were snatched from her, and she recalls how she was forced to drink water from bamboo to survive the long trek to neighbouring Bangladesh.

Of the nearly 700,000 Rohingya refugees that have crossed into Bangladesh since August 2017, well over half are women and girls, and many, like Miriam, have reported grave human rights abuses.

The Rohingya refugee crisis is extreme, yet violence against women and girls occurs everywhere, in both developed and developing nations. Worldwide including here in Australia on average one in three women face some form of violence at some point in their lives. Cases spike dramatically amid emergencies, but far too often go unreported. In this, the 21st century, rape is still used as a weapon of war, and fear, shame and stigma stops many survivors from speaking out.

And for refugees like Miriam, the risks arent over when they reach relative safety. Forced to live in makeshift camps filled with uprooted, often traumatized people, exposure and the threat of lawlessness increase the risk of violence. In desperate situations like these, where people often have just the clothes on their backs, forced marriage, child marriage, trafficking, exploitation and cases of women selling sex to survive, typically rise. This is why, in any crisis, upholding the safety and dignity of women and girls who have survived violence, or are at risk of suffering it, must be front and centre in relief efforts.

As the monsoon rains set in over the sprawling Rohingya refugee camps in Coxs Bazar, Bangladesh, Miriam has finally found some security and respite in one of the special women-only spaces set up by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), with support from the Australian government. For women who have lost everything their homes, families, livelihoods and not least their dignity there, they know that they are safe, that they have support and that they have each other.

Now, with the help of a trained counsellor, Miriam says shes working through the grief at the loss of her son and feels comfortable enough in the space to start putting plans together for her surviving family.

I have peace when I come here, she says. I get mental and physical support, and when I needed to go to the hospital, they referred me and came with me.

...

Wednesday, 23 May

17:56

Edith Babul: A Plantation That Started With Ten Indian Guava Seeds "IndyWatch Feed Politics.au"

By Scott Waide | #Inspirational #Papua New Guineans

Twenty years ago, Edith Babuls, young son, collected the seeds of a rather exotic Indian Guava fruit he found smashed on a road.

It was, at the time, a seemingly tiny deed done by a child for his mum. But over two decades, those seeds became a plantation of Indian guava trees whose fruits are now sold in Lae City.

He found the seeds and said, mum likes this fruit and he brought back about 100 seeds, said Edith Babul. From those seeds, 10 survived and those are among the trees we have now.

While Edith loved Indian guava, she didnt know the cultivation methods that would work efficiently.

At first it was all trial and error. I didnt know and I planted the seeds. It took a while.

In 2000, Edith harvested the first fruits from the initial 10 trees she had planted. She sold over 100 fruits and made K300.

Because I was still working, I told my husband and children that the demand for this fruit was good and that we had to carefully manage the trees.

It wasnt all easy. Some of the trees died and fruits were left to rot or succumbed to pest and disease.

As we walked through the guava plantation, Edith spots a large fruit. She pulls down the branch and picks a fruit which is bigger than her hand. Its fruits like this that have made her quite popular within agriculture circles.

Try it, she says, as we cut open the huge fruit. The guava is soft, delicious and far less acidic than smaller local varieties. Guava cultivation has become an art for Edith Babul.

She gives a lecture on insect management as we walk through the grove.

Never cut all the grass. When insect populations pick up in in June and July, you have to give them something to eat. Let them start with the grass first. If you remove all the grass, they will eat your fruits and leaves.

...

IndyWatch PNG Politics Feed Archiver

Go Back:30 Days | 7 Days | 2 Days | 1 Day

IndyWatch PNG Politics Feed Today.

Go Forward:1 Day | 2 Days | 7 Days | 30 Days

IndyWatch PNG Politics Feed was generated at Pacific News IndyWatch.

Resource generated at IndyWatch using aliasfeed and rawdog