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Sunday, 17 September

09:56

Snow white giraffes caught on video for the first time "IndyWatch Feed Enviro"

Two rare white giraffes have been captured on video in the wild for the first time, reports a wildlife conservancy in Kenya. The giraffes, which are leucistic, meaning they have a genetic condition that inhibits pigmentation in skin cells rather than albino, or lacking melanin throughout their bodies, were first reported back in June by villagers near the Ishaqbini Hirola Conservancy in Garissa county in northeastern Kenya, according to a blog post from the conservancy. Upon hearing of the report, members of the conservancy including Abdullahi H. Ali, the founder of the Hirola Conservation Program hurriedly headed to the scene where they encountered the animals along with a conventionally colored reticulated giraffe. They were so close and extremely calm and seemed not disturbed by our presence. The mother kept pacing back and forth a few yards in front of us while signaling the baby giraffe to hide behind the bushes a characteristic of most wildlife mothers in the wild to prevent the predation of their young, wrote the conservancy in a blog post. While rare, the sighting is not without precedent. In 2016 there was a report of a wild white giraffe in Tanzanias Tarangire National Park. A second sighting was reported in March 2016 in Ishaqbini, according to the conservancy. Other animals, ranging from mammals to birds to reptiles, have also been spotted in the wild with the condition. Nonetheless, the sighting has sparked excitement across the internet and widespread press coverage. Ali says he hopes

Friday, 15 September

12:20

We are being softened up for the re-opening of Panguna mine Papua New Guinea Mine Watch

Panguna mine now back in play

Leonard Fong Roka | PNG Attitude | 15 September 2017

PANGUNA There is a lot happening in central Bougainville around the now derelict Panguna mine.

Two local groups, with external financial backing, are engaged in awareness programs campaigning if you like for re-opening the mine that operated for about 20 years until hostilities closed it in 1989.

Thence followed the loss of some 10-15,000 Bougainvillean lives and millions and millions of kina worth of damage to assets and property.

Both of these groups on the make are yet to explain to us who suffered directly in the 10 year civil war how this awareness or campaigning for the re-opening of the mine will affect us and what our role may be.

The English word awareness (Concise Oxford 11th Edition) is defined as having knowledge or perception of a situation or fact while campaign has two meanings: the military definition which Ill ignore and the other an organised course of action to achieve a goal....

10:27

Rehabilitating wildlife in the aftermath of Harvey "IndyWatch Feed Enviro"

When the team at Bat World Sanctuary in Weatherford, Texas, a town about 30 miles west of the Dallas/Ft. Worth area, heard about what was happening to bats as Hurricane Harvey battered Houston, they knew immediately that they had to help. Bat World Sanctuarys lead animal caretaker, Erika Quinzel, headed down to Houston with a boat in tow. Her first stop was the parking garage of a skyscraper close to downtown where hundreds of bats had taken refuge from the storm. Bats are small creatures, typically about the size of a hummingbird, and they simply couldnt fly in the strong winds generated by Hurricane Harvey. By the time Qinzel arrived, the bats were already starving and dehydrated even in a flood, animals can become dehydrated, because most animals wont drink flood water. Amanda Lollar, founder and president of Bat World Sanctuary, estimates that tens of thousands of bats lost their lives during the storm and subsequent flooding. Bats must first drop off of whatever theyre clinging to in order to take flight, but the waters rose so high that many were unable to leave their roosts under bridges. There were bridges that were entirely engulfed by flood waters, where whole colonies drowned. Some that tried to leave their roosts dropped into the water and didnt make it out. Many of the bats that did manage to fly out from their roosts still ended up in the water. Its the equivalent of a human in a tsunami, its inescapable, Lollar

10:18

Call for your ideas: Action plan to reach zero carbon Centre for Climate Safety

What should the Geelong communitys Zero Carbon Action Plan look like? Have your say! Also, write a letter to the editor of the Geelong Advertiser, and get involved on Zero Emissions Day, 21 September 2017 the global 24-hour moratorium on the use of fossil fuels. Lots to do! More details below.

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